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Refurbishment of Village Bench

You may have noticed that the bench at the top of Whitsoncross lane was refurbished earlier this year. This was arranged by the Conservation Society and funded mainly with a grant from the Plymouth Octopus Project (POP), for which we are extremely grateful, with a small top-up coming from Conservation Society funds.

After obtaining multiple quotes, the job was carried out by local firm, Patton Developments who were extremely competitive in their quote and were very accommodating when carrying out the work. The end result was a significant improvement to the appearance and amenity of this bench.

Before:

After:

We are currently looking into a replacement of the Bench next to the Copleston Oak at the East of
the Church and further details will be shared as this project develops.

Telephone Box – updated article

An original red telephone box is an increasingly rare but welcome site in a rural setting and we are lucky to have retained ours in the village. After being threatened with removal at the turn of the millennium, the conservation society quickly liaised with the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and fast-tracked a statutory listing of the structure, which means that British Telecom (BT) were prevented from removing it. The listing also places an obligation on BT to maintain the phone box. After reports of it looking dilapidated, the conservation society liaised with BT to request they repaint it. Additionally, the phone inside was not working and so this was reported as a fault.

BT’s initial response was that it would be put on the list for redecoration but that it was likely not to be carried out until 2023. We were therefore delighted to see that they managed to fit it into their schedule for this year and, as the before and after results below demonstrate, this has made a significant improvement to the appearance of this asset to the village.

We are also pleased to see that the phone itself is now working again. Please note that the phone does not accept cash but can still be used to make reverse charge calls or with the aid of any number of calling cards available that use a toll-free access number.

Some before and after pictures:

Noteworthy Buildings

The Conservation Society are currently compiling a list of noteworthy buildings in the village. You may receive a visit from one of our members in the near future – any historical information on your property will be gratefully received!

Tamerton Foliot stream water quality published

For some months a resident in Riverside Walk has hosted at the bottom of their garden a water quality probe for Plymouth River Keepers.

The monthly results are here: https://tinyurl.com/3mhuphp7

The probe takes a reading every 15 minutes on depth, temperature and conductivity. In particular, it is conductivity that of interest. Conductivity is a measure of the total dissolved solids within a watercourse. In the Tamerton Foliot catchment there is low natural dissolved solids, so as a general rule an increase in conductivity is likely to be human-related. An increase in conductivity could be due to a number of factors such as sewage entering the river, industrial or chemical discharge or farm run-off. 

Local election results 2022

Local election results

Plymouth City Council elections took place on Thursday 5 May 2022 and votes were counted overnight.

Overall turnout was down on last year at 31.6%.

Southway

Turnout: 35.09%

CandidatePartyVotesElected?
Andy LuggerConservative1,153YES
Benjamin John DavyTrade Unionist and Socialist Coalition61 
Fi SmartGreen155 
Daniella Georgia MarleyLabour1140 
Emily Rose QuickIndependent626 

Climate Change

The Council are seeking consultation on the Climate Emergency Planning Policy and Guidance which ends on the 21 April 2022 at 5pm. 

The Council will accept comments via:

All the documents can be seen here www.plymouth.gov.uk/climate-planning and there is a 20 minute video about it

Environment Agency wags finger at Tamerton Residents

Residents along Riverside Walk have received a letter from the Environment Agency pointing out that the Tamerton Foliot Stream is classified as a main river, and that activities near its bank need a Flood Risk Activity Permit. This includes altering, repairing any structure in, over or under the stream, such as gabion baskets, decking or other garden structures. Without this ‘you could be breaking the law.’

Bat Survey

Bat Detectors were placed at three locations around the village to record bat activity, and classify by breed.

The detectors respond to the high frequency calls each bat makes, and because each breed has a distinctive call are able to work out which species has been detected.

More information and results below: